TUMBLEWEEDS JEWELRY
AUTHENTIC NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN NAVAJO ZUNI HOPI SANTO DOMINGO JEWELRY

Leonard Nez Navajo Kingman Turquoise Silver Pendant

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Leonard Nez Navajo Kingman Turquoise Silver Pendant

$325.00

Navajo sterling silver overlay & turquoise pendant. Natural Kingman turquoise. Measures 1-1/2 inches X 1-1/4 inches. Handmade by Navajo silversmith Leonard Nez. Item#7387

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Fabulous Native American handmade sterling silver overlay pendant, created by Navajo silversmith Leonard Nez. This is a striking piece of jewelry with a sterling silver overlay design and a natural Kingman turquoise stone.

The main pendant measures 1-1/2 inches long, not counting the bale by 1-1/4 inches wide. The overall length including the bale is 2-1/8 inches long. The bale can handle a chain up to 1/4 inches wide.

Brand new and in perfect condition. Gift Box and Certificate of Authenticity included. Hallmarked LEONARD NEZ, NAVAJO, STERLING.

Leonard Nez has been winning awards for his jewelry since 1993. His innovative style blends fine chisel and stamp work with layered overlaid silver to create some of the most stunning jewelry in the Southwest. Leonard's jewelry is shown in the top galleries in the country and his work is collected worldwide. His work utilizes only the finest gem grade natural turquoise. He is also a skilled team roping rodeo rider.

About Silver Overlay Jewelry: Overlay is a process of soldering one piece of silver, from which a design has been cut, over another piece of silver. The top layer is a handmade, hand cut overlay created from a sheet of sterling that is then bonded to the base layer of sterling. The base layer background is usually oxidized, which turns the silver surface black, and is often scratched or stamped. The oxidation brings out a contrast between the two pieces and makes the individual designs more visible. This technique remains characteristic of the Hopi Indians, although several well regarded Navajo silversmiths use it too.