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Mary Small ~ Vintage Indian Pottery Necklace ~ Jemez

Image 0 of Mary Small ~ Vintage Indian Pottery Necklace ~ Jemez Image 1 of Mary Small ~ Vintage Indian Pottery Necklace ~ Jemez Image 2 of Mary Small ~ Vintage Indian Pottery Necklace ~ Jemez Image 3 of Mary Small ~ Vintage Indian Pottery Necklace ~ Jemez

Mary Small ~ Vintage Indian Pottery Necklace ~ Jemez

$395.00

One of a kind Vintage Native American pottery necklace, featuring a double sided pottery naja with two pottery wedding vase side pieces. Traditional Jemez pottery work incorporated into a necklace. Turquoise accents and turquoise nugget necklace. 28 long, end to end. From a private collection. circa 1960-70's. Item# 9012

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I doubt you'll ever see another necklace like this one. This necklace feature a pottery naja with two pottery wedding vase side pieces. All three pottery pieces are three dimensional with different designs on all sides. The pieces are set with turquoise nuggets and strung on a turquoise nugget necklace.

The necklace measures 28 long, end to end, and hangs down 16 from the back of the neck to the bottom of the naja. The naja measures 2-1/2 by 2-1/2 and the wedding vases measure 2-1/2 long. Finished off with white shell heishi and hook and eye secure fastener. Signed by the artist. From a private collection. circa 1960-70's. Excellent condition.

Mary Small, a celebrated potter from Jemez Pueblo, was named the Indian Art and Craft Associations artist of the year in 2002 and 2010. Mary learned to make pottery using the traditional coiling method from her mother, Perfectita Toya, another well-known potter. Mary's innovative work has been credited with the revival of interest in traditional pottery among her Jemez Pueblo People.

The crescent shaped naja is one of the most familiar forms in Navajo indian jewelry. It clearly comes from outside the Navajo culture. It is thought to have originated in the Old World as a Spanish horse gear - a third eye placed on the animals forehead to ward off evil. It is often used as a focus piece in " squash blossoms " are actually pomegranate blossoms that were worn as trouser decorations by Spanish Colonial gentleman.